Fussin’ and fightin’ is how San Diego and the Chargers negotiate

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San Diego’s verbal tussle with the Chargers continues to get more contentious. Which brings this question: Could enough money be raised for a new venue in this matter?

Pay per view: Faulconer vs. Fabiani and let the mudslinging begin.

OK, not a chance. San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer and Chargers counsel Mark Fabiani fight with words, not fists. And it reached a zenith this week, a week that was among the wackiest in San Diego’s sports history.

Don’t think so?

When was the last time a mayor called the Chargers, liars?

When was the last time a Chargers official called the mayor’s office “amateur”?

When was the last time the Padres had three manager in three days?

You get the drift.

San Diego was not only America’s Finest City, but its feistiest. …

San Diego and the Chargers aren’t negotiating — they’re laying ground work for a reality show. The Hatfield and McCoy’s were blood brothers compared to these two and now the Chargers are saying, “no mas.”

They’re not buying the legal standing of a proposed Dec. 15 election, which only San Diego folks can vote on.

San Diego counters that every time it offers something, the Chargers’ attack dog, Fabiani, shows his teeth.

Grin and bear it? Not so, declares San Diego, and now it’ll takes its plan right to the NFL.

That’s cool and there’s nothing to lose getting an audience with the NFL powers-that-be. But the NFL backs its teams like a mother hen, and brother, no way it sides with a jilted city over an owner’s attempt to make the other owners richer. …

 

Padres interim manager Pat Murphy returns to the Valley of the Sun on Friday, where the Padres open a three-game set with the Arizona Diamondbacks. Murphy had a cactus barrel full of fun in the area, where he coached Arizona State to four NCAA regional appearances.

“Hey Murphy, you still got your tab over at Don & Charlie’s?” he was asked before departing on the road trip.

Murphy laughed. “I haven’t been there in a while,” he replied, with a smile that said good times were once had by all.

So maybe Murphy doesn’t hit the legendary baseball chop house in Scottsdale. And really, if he’s up that way, the Italian Grotto on Scottsdale Boulevard shouldn’t be missed. But after 15 seasons coaching at ASU, Murphy’s pass list should be in the double figures this weekend. …

 

Is it just me or were Murphy and former football coach Barry Switzer separated at birth? …

 

In watching Thursday’s Padres win over the A’s, one needed a CPR pamphlet.

When Derek Norris made his acrobatic catch of a foul ball at first base, he put two fingers to his neck in checking his pulse.

Then post game, Murphy was showered with Coors Light and baby powder to celebrate his first win as a Major League manager.

“I thought I was going to have a heart attack,” he said. …

 

Bud Black, the man Murphy replaced, has yet to say a peep about being shown the door after eight-plus seasons. When Black does speak, you can bet he’ll be all class and no sass despite being bummed about being bounced. …

 

Paging Phil Mickelson. Mr. Mickelson, please report to the U.S. Open.

Not sure what was more stunning in the opening round of this Major: the Chambers Bay golf course’s scenery or Mickelson playing it safe. …

 

Rod Carew was at the Tony Gwynn Classic kickoff and that tells you how much Carew thought of Gwynn. The eight-team college baseball tournament, which was announced on the one-year anniversary of Gwynn’s death, is Feb. 26-28 at San Diego State and the University of San Diego.

“Tony and I were good friends,” Carew said. “I didn’t have to see Tony Gwynn every day to know he was my friend. That’s just the way Tony was. His passing affected me greatly because I loved him so much and still do.”

Please know that Carew was Gwynn’s idol. Gwynn studied his hitting style and approach at the plate with the same passion he displayed when climbing into the box.

But this wasn’t a day to talk about batting. Gwynn was a Hall of Famer in that regard, but there was so much more to our beloved No. 19.

“In baseball I’ve met three people that were special, two I played with: Tony Oliva and Harmon Killebrew,” Carew said. “And Tony Gwynn. They were humble.”

“When I met Tony Oliva and Harmon, I learned from them. Then I met Tony Gwynn and he was that type of person. People don’t understand how unbelievable he was.”

What would Gwynn think of a tournament bearing his name? He would show a modest grin and a wink.

“He would say ‘let’s play ball and get on the field,'” Carew said.

 

Keep an eye on junior player Taylor Fitz, 17, at the upcoming Wimbledon. The Rancho Santa Fe resident was a finalist at the recent French Open. …

 

I’ve kept watch on what Cameron Maybin is doing with the Braves, and I can’t believe it either.

 

+ Contact Jay Paris at jparis@bcaradio.com. Follow him on Twitter on @jparis_sports.

Comments

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One thought on “Fussin’ and fightin’ is how San Diego and the Chargers negotiate

  1. Cecil Treadwell

    Clear the decks and let the CHARGERS and their GREEDY OWNER leave town!
    We’ve had it with their narrow minded selfishness.
    SOCCER is the new CENTERPIECE SPORT in many cities now especially in San Diego.
    You could have 20 SOCCER fields in Mission Valley and every one would be filled with teams playing matches every day of the week.
    Pay attention City Council.
    Pay attention Mister Mayor.
    You are sitting on a GOLD MINE!!!!!!
    SOCCER can be the main sport engine driving high revenue for the City of San Diego, but only if they can fully understand the growing popularity of SOCCER in the San Diego market and beyond..

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